KIP MOORE Plead The Fifth Tour w/ Drake White & The Big Fire!

KICX 106, Mavricks & Impact Live Present

KIP MOORE Plead The Fifth Tour w/ Drake White & The Big Fire!

FAIRGROUND SAINTS

Fri · March 23, 2018

Doors: 7:00 pm / Show: 8:15 pm

Mavricks Music Hall

Barrie, ON

This event is 19 and over

Kicx106, Mavricks & Impact Live presents Multi-PLATINUM singer/songwriter KIP MOORE headlining the PLEAD THE FIFTH TOUR with Drake White & The Big Fire & special guests Fairground Saints Friday, March 23/18 at Mavricks!

Kip Moore
Kip Moore
Singer-songwriter Kip Moore combines a raw and rustic voice with compelling lyrics of honesty to create a unique sound that’s simultaneously hypnotic and edgy. His voice is weathered by life’s detours and disappointments and strengthened by his dreams and determination. His music is infused with relentless intensity, both of passion and frustration.

The boy who grew up daydreaming about life outside of the small town of Tifton, Ga., became a man who has been continually inspired by Bruce Springsteen and Kris Kristofferson to paint vivid portraits with his lyrics.

“I am not drawn to the fairytale kind of love,” says Kip, who had a hand in writing every song on his debut album. “I am drawn to the real-life experiences between a woman and a man. I try to sing about the way it is, but yet at the same time, what you can hope for between a couple. I don’t intend to paint of picture of what it’s really not.”

His music powerfully captures some of the contradictions that he grapples with personally. Although he’s from a large family and enjoys musical collaborations and performing onstage, he’s an introvert who is often more comfortable being alone. “There’s a combativeness to the music too, a fight within,” he says. “With ‘Faith When I Fall,’ I know how bad I need that spiritual realm, but yet I find myself on this other end a lot of times.”

Despite its edge, his music remains desperately optimistic. “I am hoping for what I have yet to become,” he says. “I feel like it’s hopeful for what I’ve yet reached, how I look forward to feeling, but I haven’t gotten there yet.

“I have truly lived my music to a sense, even the milestones I haven’t reached yet,” he says. “I have been in those moments. I’ve been at those crossroads with a girl: ‘Are we going to take that next step?’ I look forward to taking that next step, but I haven’t wanted to yet. I look forward to being ready for that.”

He was born in Tifton, near the Florida line, and was one of six children, the youngest boy who had three younger sisters. “You had to make your own fun, for sure,” he says of Tifton. “I had a lot of time for daydreaming. It was a great town, but I dreamed about getting out. I do enjoy going back now.”

His father was a golf pro and his mother was a painter who used anything handy for a canvas, whether it was cake plates or baby crates. She also taught piano and played the church organ. “I can remember sleeping in the pews,” he recalls. “She would bring us blankets and give us a coloring book and we’d sit there while she played.”

Weekends were often spent driving to the beach with his father for fishing expeditions. “He would play a lot of Jackson Browne, Willie Nelson, Bob Seger, Tom Petty and Bruce Springsteen,” he says. “As early as I can remember, I always gravitated toward lyrics. Even when I hadn’t lived enough to understand then, they still shaped me. “

During high school, he secretly began playing his brother’s guitar because he was intimidated by the talent of his mother and older brother. “I would play when nobody was around, just figuring out stuff, watching his hands and trying to do the same thing.”

He played point guard for Wallace State’s basketball team and also played on its golf team in Hanceville, Ala., for two years and then transferred to Valdolsta State University on a golf scholarship. He wrote songs daily and joined a band that performed throughout the South, providing him with all of his income. “I was one of those kinds who didn’t know what I wanted to do with my life,” he says. “I didn’t know music was an option. Maybe it was one of those things where I didn’t quite believe in myself enough.”

Although he devoted every free moment to music during college, his parents still didn’t know about his musical activities. “They were all shocked when they found out about it because they didn’t know I could sing or play,” he says.

After graduation and a short stint as a bartender on St. Simon’s Island, he moved to Hawaii on a whim with just a backpack, a surfboard and a friend. They slept on an airport bench the first night and then lucked into a hut that was $50 a month. They would walk or hitchhike the mile to the beach daily. After six months of this tropical paradise, Kip thought he had found his permanent home until his friend encouraged him to pursue songwriting as a living.

“I didn’t know a whole lot about the world of songwriting,” he says. “I just did it for my own enjoyment. We talked about Nashville and I ended up saying, ‘I’m going to give it a shot.’ I flew back home and told my folks. They thought I was crazy. Now they’ll say different, that they knew all along.”

He drove to Nashville on Jan. 1, 2004 in an old black Nissan truck that contained one bag and his guitar. He immersed himself in the songwriting community, observing songwriters’ rounds for two years and honing his craft before gaining the confidence to join in. After four years of performing locally, he caught the attention of Creative Artist Agency’s Mark Dennis, who called Universal Music Group Nashville’s Joe Fisher. Not only did Joe’s encounter lead to his record deal with MCA Nashville, but it also brought about his introduction to songwriter Brett James, who produced Kip’s debut album.

“Brett gave me the freedom to find who I was as an artist, the freedom for writing a different kind of thing, a different kind of melody and lyric,” he says. “He gave me room to grow.”

He also found important relationships with songwriters Dan Couch, Scott Steppakoff, Westin Davis and Kiefer Thompson, two of whom didn’t have publishing deals when he began writing with them. “There was definitely a special thing when we got in the room together,” Kip says. “I got offers to write with a lot of the bigger guns in town, but I enjoyed what I was doing with them. They were open to my ideas of being different.”

And different his debut project is, as evidenced by the album’s first single, “Mary Was the Marrying Kind,” the story of the one who got away. The dreamy and spell-binding song is the true story of one of Kip’s friends, who returned to his hometown after about six years and saw the once tall, lanky girl who had since come into her own and become a model.

“It’s the story of what every man in this world goes through at some point,” he says. “It’s the story of the one that got away that you should have paid attention to. Every town, every city, everybody knows one. Every girl believes they are Mary.”

The anthemic “Drive Me Crazy” is the story of two troubled teens who find a safe harbor in each other, if only for a few fleeting moments. “They are the getaway car for each other from everyday life,” he says. “When they’re together, what they live in is in the rear-view mirror and it’s just one big infatuation love story that lasts for a very short time.

With its irresistible bass line and drums, “Up All Night” is about continuing to live life to its fullest. “’Up All Night’ is the story of not wanting to give into your age and how life is supposed to be lived once you reach a certain age,” he says.

When Kip plays shows, he’s often asked for advice by aspiring songwriters. “Everybody’s experience is different, but I do believe it has to be the only thing,” he says. “I don’t think it can be a gray line. Either you want it and there’s nothing else or it’s not going to happen.”

For instance, Kip was offered a sales position with an enticing salary, but it required working six days a week, leaving no time for creating music. “You come to the crossroads: do you really want this? Are you willing to sacrifice everything, including relationships? I can’t tell you how many relationships have been doomed from the get-go because of this.

“It only took me a few minutes to decline it. It’s such a risk and it’s an alone feeling – you feel like you’re on an island by yourself – but it’s worth every single minute. Had I taken that job, I wouldn’t be sitting here today.”
Drake White
Drake White
Every reaction begins with a catalyst, some initial event that sets things on their inexorable course. For Drake White, it goes back to something raw and elemental in his debut album Spark."I learned how to play guitar and keep people's attention around a fire," explains the Hokes Bluff, Alabama native. "A spark can start a fire that can keep you alive and sustain you. So this is the beginning for me. This is the first strike of the flint."The spirit of Spark comes from those simple, early days spent enjoying the outdoors among friends in the warm glow of a fire. And though he's now a city dweller with all the complications and distractions that entails, White still seeks the freedom and deeper connections he felt when the chorus of nature and the strums of his guitar blended into one harmonious song — the kind of contentment he sings about in the swirling majesty of his single "Livin' the Dream.""We grew up free. We grew up on 4-wheelers, riding through the backwoods," he says. "We grew up hunting and fishing and being out in the Appalachian Mountains. People don't understand how beautiful north Alabama is until you see it in person."Save for "Livin' the Dream," White wrote or co-wrote the remaining 11 tracks on Spark, working with red-hot producers Ross Copperman and Jeremy Stover through the process. He also brought in his own band for a handful of tracks to capture the energy of his live shows. The first sound on Spark — before the pulse-quickening "Heartbeat" kicks into gear — is the voice of White's late grandfather speaking from the pulpit. Several of these ghostly transmissions from the past appear on Spark, all extolling the virtues of love, brotherhood and nature. It's a touch of the surreal that nods at White's fondness for Pink Floyd's psychedelic masterpiece The Wall, but also a deeply personal gesture that matches his vision perfectly."I went through about five or six sermons of my grandfather and picked out certain little snippets," he says. "I just think they kind of fit. They're weird and people are asking what they are. And that was my point: to get people talking about it."White has his own message of finding some harmony amid the demands of modern life, one that goes down easy in the uplifting, Zac Brown Band-assisted Southern rock anthem "Back to Free" and the cautionary-but-soulful "I Need Real." It's a simple message of not letting oneself be swallowed up by technology and seeking out honest, genuine connections with others."When I'm at home, my wife and I keep our phones in the bedroom," says White. "We listen to records. We hardly turn the TV on, unless it's time for Game of Thrones. Before social networking was a smartphone app, we did it around a fire. That goes way back."With his gospel-derived, passionate delivery, White seems to have inherited his grandfather's ability to touch crowds with a sermon — his divine vocal improvisations at the end of the honky-tonk flavored "Story" will undoubtedly get butts out of seats. White stresses that he isn't a preacher, but doesn't see a problem with putting his own methods for surviving the world out there. "Some of the best songs, like Buffalo Springfield's "For What It's Worth" or anything by Bob Marley, have a little bit of preachin'," he says. "I never want to come across too preachy, but instead I'm saying, 'Hey man, this is my life, and this is what I do to be happy and I'm figuring it out just like you.'"Spark covers an entire spectrum of emotions beyond these statements of character and self-definition. In "Making Me Look Good Again," White cruises on an R&B-style groove to express his gratitude for his better
Drake White | SPARK | August 19

half, while "Waiting on the Whiskey to Work" finds him embodying a man spun out on love and heartbreak. Then in the tropically-themed "Equator," he flies south to give his nomadic side a little time to play."This record is about balance. It's me asking, where's that boy I used to be? Oh yeah, we gotta go get him back," he says. "We gotta go on a hike or camping or grab my wife and go to some foreign country. I gotta feel alive. I gotta go out there and do that."Long a respected live entertainer with his (appropriately named) band the Big Fire, White's climb to the limelight hasn't been a straight or uncomplicated one. Rather than blowing up right away with a big debut single, he's toiled on the road for years, giving jaw-dropping performances night after night and making believers one show at a time."There are many different paths. And mine was just in a van with a trailer," he says. "I wanted to have a group of guys that went out and did it the hard way and learned from people like Zac Brown and Eric Church, and these guys that did years of hard touring. There were definitely times where I was like, screw this. But now that I look back it's a perfectly fitted puzzle piece. It gave me everything I desired."In the album's "Elvis," White touches on the way hard work plays into the business of making dreams come true. "Rome wasn't built in a day and Elvis wasn't born the king," he sings, acknowledging the long incubation period he's had in the buildup to this moment. "I'm gonna be an artist 'til the day I die," he says. "Don't matter if I make money at it or I don't. that's the blessing and the curse. I do this because this is what I am supposed to do. And I feel happy when I'm writing, when I'm helping people and when I'm out there singing and performing."And all the while, he'll be stoking that original fire until it's a roaring blaze.
FAIRGROUND SAINTS
FAIRGROUND SAINTS
Santa Barbara born and now Nashville based trio Fairground Saints create their warm and wistful sound by playing off the delicate contradictions at the heart of their music. Their unique California country sound, layered three part harmonies and solid musicianship is impressive beyond their years. With each member sharing songwriting duties, Mason Van Valin and Elijah Edwards impart a starkly literate, sometimes-gritty sense of introspection informed by artists like Bob Dylan and Jim Messina, while their fellow vocalist Megan McAllister lends a soulful vulnerability and gutsy intimacy inspired by everyone from Shania Twain to Stevie Nicks. “We each bring in our own different elements, but what connects us is the level of honesty that we go for in our songs,” says McAllister. And in achieving that honesty, Fairground Saints infuse their music with intense emotional power. “All of us in the band believe in being as real as possible with our music, and not shying away from wherever a song is trying to take us,” Van Valin says. Fairground Saints’ easy chemistry and a shared sensibility feels beamed in from the golden era of singer-songwriters.
Venue Information:
Mavricks Music Hall
46 Dunlop Street West
Barrie, ON, L4N 0J3